Solo Backpacking in Bolivia

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

I backpacked through Bolivia, and really loved my solo travel adventure. Here are the top of top things to do in Bolivia:

 

1. Salar de Uyuni

Stars Van, Salar De Uyuni Bolivia Salt Flats

Stars Van, Salar De Uyuni Bolivia Salt Flats

The vast lunar-like plains of Bolivia’s Salt Flats sit 3,656 meters above sea level. When prehistoric lakes evaporated they left behind an incredibly flat, bright white legacy that is the Salar de Uyuni. The slat flats extend for over 4050 square miles, making them the largest in the world. They are even visible from space and are used to calibrate satellites.

The crust is a dense layer of salt, under which sits a layer of brine that is contains between 50%-70% of the world’s known lithium reserves. This element is responsible for powering laptops, smart phones, and electric cars, meaning the Salar de Uyuni is a lucrative extraction site.

These otherworldly plains stretch all the way to the horizon, and since there are no hills or trees etc. for visual reference, it is hard to judge distance and perspective. Tourists love to take perspective photos, especially with toy dinosaurs.

There are times in the year when the salt flats flood, creating a vast mirror like surface, reflecting the sky and making this landscape even more beautiful.

Once the sun goes down, the stars come out and the Salar de Uyuni is transformed once again. Watch in awe as the Milky Way passes over your head and transports you into space.

If you venture further into the flats, you will find the cacti-studded Isla Incahuasi, home to giant Trichocereus cactuses. There is also the “Red Lake” of Laguna Colorada so called due to the algae, which attracts three different species of flamingo. The Salar de Uyuni is truly a unique place to visit!

From Rachel, theworldinaweekend.com

 

2. Bolivian Pampas

Bolivian Pampas

Bolivian Pampas

When in South America, entering the Amazon is on everybody’s bucket list. Luckily in almost every country in South America, it is possible to visit the Amazon. I visited the pampas region of the Amazon in Bolivia.
The pampas are the wetland region of the Amazon and it is the location where you have the best opportunity to see wildlife especially birds, monkeys and caimans. All these animals are in abundance during both the wet and dry season.
By far the easiest way to reach the town of Rurrenabaque in Northern Bolivia is to fly from La Paz. This town acts as the gateway to the Amazon basin and is the closest thing to civilization for quite a distance.
Another way to reach the town is by taking a very long overnight bus on some of the most dangerous roads in Bolivia. The flight, on the other hand, takes around one hour.
There are two options for visiting the Amazon, you can go to the Pampas as I did, or you go do a jungle trek into the Amazon canopy.
I chose the former as I wanted to see the wildlife and I was not disappointed. Over the three days, we spent on the wetlands we saw River dolphins, various types of monkeys and birds and a host of alligators and caimans.
Seeing how the locals live and interact with the animals and their surroundings is also quite special, they know tricks and ways of finding animals I have rarely seen on any other trip.
Put the Pampas on your bucket list.

Eoindolly, dollysquest.com

 

3. Cycling Bolivia’s Death Road

Death Road Bolivia

Death Road Bolivia

“Would you dare to cycle the world’s most dangerous road? Well you can if visiting the city of La Paz in Bolivia. Many tour companies leave from La Paz and drive you out to La Carretera de los Yunga for the ride of your life.

The first hour of the ride is a settler where you peddle on smooth roads, avoiding the crazy Bolivian drivers then the next stage is where the activity gets serious – taking on the Death Road!

The terrain is stony and the drop is deep at 4,650 metre drop. The 43 mile cycle route is not actually called the ‘World’s Most Dangerous Road’ because of cyclist deaths though, this relates to the number of men who died making the road. There have, however, been hundreds of car accident casualties and a handful of cycling fatalities (included tour guides) so pick your tour group wisely.

From Gemma, twoscotsabroad.com


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

No Comments

Leave a Comment